• slowblogging_New

    slowblogging_New

  • natalie-goldberg

    natalie-goldberg

  • W

    the rebirth of slow blogging (and a new direction).

    12.20.2012 / WORK

     

    “If you’re having difficulty coming up with new ideas, then slow down. For me, slowing down has been a tremendous source of creativity. It has allowed me to open up — to know that there’s life under the earth and that I have to let it come through me in a new way. Creativity exists in the present moment. You can’t find it anywhere else.”
    -Natalie Goldberg

     I’ve shared before my history of blogging – how it began in 2001, the early days before social media and platforms and curation and all the catch phrases that often appear in our inboxes each morning, promising endless Internet fame. And it’s funny how I can look back and see emerging themes and thought processes for every year I’ve been blogging. I hadn’t realized how much this blog has changed until I look at this post in chronological order. And I see it so clearly, the evolution of it all.

    And if this is true, if I continually re-invent myself in some small way each year (whether intentionally or not), then I want 2013 to do the same. And in 2013, I want my blog to come full circle. I want to return Design for Mankind to its roots: of research, of discovery, of thoughtfulness.

    We live in a world of more; this much is obvious. More things, more information. More time-saving tricks we use to find the time to uncover even more time-saving tricks. We live in a world of Pinterest, where visual images shoot out like firehoses of pretty, manifesting themselves in the parts of our brain we reserve for planning elaborate feasts and fetes. We have hundreds of RSS subscriptions to blogs creating amazing tablescapes and Halloween costumes and DIY floor lamps. And we take it all in, bookmarking each project for future use when “someday” is finally today.

    Yet friends, I fear that someday will never come. Because there will continually be more to do, to see, to buy. And our someday file will slowly become outdated with a new sea of ideas and thoughts promising to fulfill our lives in ways we never dreamed possible.

    I want less. I want less for this site; I want less for my life. I want to return to the days when I didn’t feel the need to “keep up” with the Internet. Where less truly was more, where editorial calendars didn’t exist and the words “I should totally blog this” were never uttered.

    I miss the days when blogging itself was my muse. When the simple act of sharing something I stumbled upon was the joy itself, rather than a frenzied race to click link after link in hopes that I’ll have discovered something truly amazing.

    There is more noise, and my ears are tired.

    This year, one of my personal resolutions is to live a slower, more thoughtful (meaningful?) life. Less travel, more adventure. Less work, more challenges. And I need this to translate into all areas of my life: Less blogging, more learning. Less links, more inspiration. Less projects, more processes.

    Over the next few weeks, I’ll be taking time off to enjoy my family, friends and this beautiful holiday season. And when I return in 2013, a new Design for Mankind will be greeting us.

    I encourage you to add the site to your RSS feed, as posts will be much more infrequent in this coming year. Instead, they’ll be more heavily curated and story-driven, harking back to my first love: writing. And I am thrilled.

    I’ll be featuring the same visually inspiring artists, designers, photographers and creatives, yes. But rather than a simple link and quick emotion, I will be uncovering a bit more behind each project – the inspirations, the struggles, the history. It is my hope that by doing so, we’ll all learn a bit more about the creative process – and ourselves.

    The true design for mankind.

    I can’t wait for you to come along. Much love to each of you this holiday season; I wish you many moments of slowness.

    XO,
    Erin Loechner

    • Hooray for you. I’ve been having these same thoughts (not about blogging less) but about the intensity and over-saturation of media, images, things to process. For me, my blog is about decompressing and processing the things I take in. These past six months have been a busy season for me and have given me little room for reflection. Looking forward to that. Looking forward to your new direction too. :)

    • Jess

      Hi Erin!
      I stumbled upon your blog today while blog hopping and taking in more while secretly wanting less…serendipitous! So today I vow to declutter my blog feeder (with the exception of adding yours ;), and follow less people on pinterest! Thanks for the thoughtful post! I look forward to more…you know, when you’re inspired.

    • Go Erin! I think you’re coming out ahead of the trend– we’re all starting to burn out of the “post post post” mentality that blogging has become. We are here for YOU and we want to follow along with your thoughts and interests. Have a wonderful holiday!

    • I’m so excited about this new direction and shift in focus. You’re a wonderful curator but it’s WHO YOU ARE that is so inspiring. I’m looking forward to seeing more of *you* around here. XOXO

    • Ah! Thank God! I was worried and I didn’t know if I’d like where this post was going. ;) I completely agree with you and I look forward to the less frequent but very meaningful posts here in the future! Have a wonderful holiday!!

    • This post made my day! I’ve been wondering whether there’s a way to make slow blogging work, and you’ve really nailed it. Quality over quantity is always more meaningful (for readers and writers) and I love the idea of digging deeper and focusing on storytelling.

    • Reading this first thing this morning was a wonderful way to start my day. You voice so perfectly what I, and I know so many other bloggers, are feeling. Sometimes blogging/social media brings me back to high school when kids felt they had to find some cool thing first but act like it was no big effort, they just happened upon it.I want to slow down internally. I try to remind myself that it is the passion that propelled me into this in the first place and that’s the thing–however I do it–that I need to hold on to.

    • amen, erin. And it’s great to hear a “bigger blogger” say it. For those of us who keep blogs that are more recreational in nature, it’s nice to know that others feel the same way. The world of blogs and visual imagery can be sucha beautiful place but it can make you feel lost as well. In farsi, there is an expression that says “My head is crowded” and it effectively means “I’m busy”. And when you think about the first thing most people say when you ask them how they are, the response “I’m so busy”. Maybe if we were less crowded with all of these things, we’d be a little less busy too. Have a wonderful holiday season, and looking forward to reading along in 2013.

    • How wonderful! I actually felt my pulse slow as I read this. And it rings so true. The past few years I have been thinking quite a bit about simplicity and happiness and mindfulness, and all roads seem to lead to the same place. I hope to dip my toes into the waters of simple mindfulness this year, and look forward to the new energy coming off your blog.

    • I can’t thank you guys enough for the positive feedback already – it’s a pull that I’ve felt for awhile and I’m so very happy to follow my instinct, but it always helps tremendously when there is an outpouring of support to match your sentiments! I’m a lucky girl indeed.

      Big hugs to each of you, and I’ll see you [slowly] in 2013!

      p.s. For those of you that mentioned you’d like to see more ME here, I’m so very flattered to hear that! I haven’t yet decided how prevalent my personal life will be showcased (likely not much), but feel free to follow me on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook for daily Erin snippets. :)

      http://twitter.com/erinloechner
      http://instagram.com/erinloechner
      http://www.facebook.com/erinloechner

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